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Representation of Function States in Knowledge Base

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102662D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barrett, KL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of representing function states in the function knowledge base of IVGEN. As each function is executed, it is desirable to have some of its aspects (the states of that function) trigger an error condition or the execution of another function.

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Representation of Function States in Knowledge Base

       Disclosed is a method of representing function states in
the function knowledge base of IVGEN.  As each function is executed,
it is desirable to have some of its aspects (the states of that
function) trigger an error condition or the execution of another
function.

      Create a FUN_STATES slot as a member slot of the function unit
in the function knowledge base.  This slot contains a list of all
defined states that are significant to the designer.  These states
are defined as a combination of the current state and input signals.
Each time any one or more of the inputs are changed, the function
enters a new state.  The current state is necessary for the
triggering of succeeding states.  In Fig. 1, the state_0, state_2 and
state_6 are the same except that state_2 comes after state_1 and
state_6 comes after state_5.

      In the FUN_STATES slot of the function, each state is
represented as a list, of which the first element (the CAR of the
list) is the state name, and the rest (the CDR of the list) is a
list of current state and inputs.  The CAR of this list is the
current state, and the rest of the list comprises of pairs of inputs
and their values.  Fig. 2 shows a structure of FUN_STATES.

      The same concept is also used to describe any state machine
(e.g., Processor bus, etc.).  The example of a state machine
organization is derived from the bubble diagram.