Browse Prior Art Database

Liquid Crystal Diode Bar Code Unit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102673D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 3 page(s) / 139K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McLean, JG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A unit is described whereby a small liquid crystal diode (LCD) is used to display patterns of the standard universal product bar code. The pattern can be implanted or changed by downloading from a LCD bar code program, or it can contain a code hardwired into memory chips.

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Liquid Crystal Diode Bar Code Unit

       A unit is described whereby a small liquid crystal diode
(LCD) is used to display patterns of the standard universal product
bar code.  The pattern can be implanted or changed by downloading
from a LCD bar code program, or it can contain a code hardwired into
memory chips.

      In prior art, standard universal product bar codes were printed
on a paper surface to provide identification and pricing of a
product. Sticky paper labels containing the bar codes were often used
to adhere to a product and required many label designs to represent
the many different products.

      The concept described herein provides a programmable means of
implementing or changing bar codes onto a surface for identification.
Not only are the number of different types of required stock labels
reduced, but additional information can be supplied.  For example,
time and date information can be added to the identification media
for delivery verification of mail or packages.  Also, rental
products, such as VCR tapes, library books, or other time-loaned
materials can easily verify the returned date, by using automatic
scanning bar code readers.

      The unit utilizes a light-sensing LCD tuned to the frequency of
the light used by the bar code reader.  The sensor is accessible
through a small port adjacent to the bar code area.  The unit turns
OFF after a short period to conserve the battery.  Exposing the
sensor to the read ers light, or other infrared (IR) light trigger,
causes the display to instantly turn ON for a preset time period.  A
sensor circuit is used to program and encode the bar code pattern
through a serial digital data stream of light pulses received from a
programming wand, or mass programming lamp. The entire unit is sealed
with no electrical contacts or moving parts.  Since it is sealed, the
unit can be used in environments which would be unaccep...