Browse Prior Art Database

Trouble-Free High Reliability Spacer Feeder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102715D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 3 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gorman, RE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a spacer feeder mechanism which utilizes variable speed motors and an optical switch to provide high reliability in the mechanism.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Trouble-Free High Reliability Spacer Feeder

       This article describes a spacer feeder mechanism which
utilizes variable speed motors and an optical switch to provide high
reliability in the mechanism.

      The existing spacer feeder utilizes fixed speed motors. The
level sensor is an electro-mechanical switch.  The elevator moves up
when the level switch is open and stops when the switch is closed.
The distance between the high and low feed levels is determined by
the opening and closure of the level switch.  This distance is not
accurate and, furthermore, it cannot be controlled.  In addition, the
direction of the elevator is controlled by electro-mechanical relays.
The improved spacer feeder disclosed herein utilizes variable speed
motors.  The speed and direction of the elevator motor is controlled
by a digital analog (D/A) converter and operational amplifiers.  The
level sensor is an optical switch.  The high feed level is registered
when the level sensor is made.  The controller counts the number of
sheets that are fed.  The low feed level is defined when the number
of fed sheets is equal to the preset number on the thumbwheel
switches.  The low feed level also tells the elevator to advance
slowly to the high feed level.

      Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a top view of the spacer
feeder mechanism disclosed herein.  Fig. 2 is a side view of the
mechanism.  Fig. 3 is a partial cross-section view across A-A of Fig.
1.  A stack of spacers is loaded onto the elevator 1.  Level sensor 2
senses the high level feed through arm 3.  Arm 3 moves up and down
with elevator 1 in the opposite direction to roller 4, which rides on
top of the spacer stack.  The elevator advances to the proper height
after a preset number of spacers is reached.  Feeder motor 5 drives
pulley 6 at a predet...