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Printed Circuit Card Cassette

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102773D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jalanti, DJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Today's logic cards operate at extremely high data rates and are therefore radiators of low strength, air-born signals. Due to the very low current requirements required to operate these devices, they are also subject to "interference" from other signal radiators and can be permanently damaged by ESD. The metal shell which is employed in this design limits the susceptibility of the device so enclosed to all of the exposures listed above.

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Printed Circuit Card Cassette

      Today's logic cards operate at extremely high data rates and
are therefore radiators of low strength, air-born signals. Due to the
very low current requirements required to operate these devices, they
are also subject to "interference" from other signal radiators and
can be permanently damaged by ESD.  The metal shell which is employed
in this design limits the susceptibility of the device so enclosed to
all of the exposures listed above.

      Logic card designs have become very dense.  Less power is
dissipated per component but, due to the density of the packaging,
more power is dissipated in an area and at the same time the
components dissipating the power are more susceptible to failure
caused by heat.  The metal enclosure provides in conjunction with the
thermal rubber, a heat sink with enough performance to allow a great
deal of flexibility in placing the device.

      There is a concern on the part of some manufacturers, that
devices which might be handled by non-technically oriented employees
should not look imposing or technical. The metal enclosure provides
such a package.  It also renders the device quite safe from
inadvertent discharge of static electricity which could render the
device unserviceable.

      Disclosed anonymously.