Browse Prior Art Database

Time Zone Entry of Calendar Events

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102803D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vincent, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Consider a computer calendar application which maintains a data base of calendar events. The events consist of an optional start time, an optional end time, and a description. Current art provides for the entry and display of events for one or more days of events. The current art manages this by keeping the data base of calendar events organized by day, month, and year.

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Time Zone Entry of Calendar Events

      Consider a computer calendar application which maintains a data
base of calendar events.  The events consist of an optional start
time, an optional end time, and a description.  Current art provides
for the entry and display of events for one or more days of events.
The current art manages this by keeping the data base of calendar
events organized by day, month, and year.

      The proposed method would allow the user to enter the time zone
of the event along with the suffix "a.m.", or "p.m."  For example,
consider a user in Dallas who is arranging a phone call with a person
in Seattle.  They decide to call at noon on the 24th, Pacific
Daylight Time (PDT).  In the existing calendar systems, the user in
Dallas would have to adjust the time of noon to Central Daylight Time
(CDT) and enter the event into the calendar data base.

      In the proposed method, the user could enter the time of the
event as "12:00 p.m. PDT".  The calendar system would know that PDT
was offset by two hours from the time zone, CDT, of the user entering
the event and would adjust the start time of the event to "2:00 p.m.
CDT" before recording the event in the user's event data base.

      New to this method is allowing the time-zone designation to be
entered as part of the time of a calendar event.

      The proposed method makes easier the use of a calendar system.

      Disclosed anonymously.