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Browse Prior Art Database

Reduced Interference Flow Control for Broadcast Media

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102844D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Griefer, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is described for doing flow control (pacing) over a broadcast medium with many producers and consumers so that the chance of buffer overrun is reduced (not eliminated), but the number of control messages per unit time is constant rather than proportional to the traffic and acknowledgements corresponding to windowing schemes are not used. In this method each producer controls a separate burst rate for each target (consumer). A consumer periodically monitors the utilization of its receive buffers and, if necessary, broadcasts a message to all producers to adjust their rates corresponding to it as a target.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 94% of the total text.

Reduced Interference Flow Control for Broadcast Media

      A method is described for doing flow control (pacing) over a
broadcast medium with many producers and consumers so that the chance
of buffer overrun is reduced (not eliminated), but the number of
control messages per unit time is constant rather than proportional
to the traffic and acknowledgements corresponding to windowing
schemes are not used.  In this method each producer controls a
separate burst rate for each target (consumer).  A consumer
periodically monitors the utilization of its receive buffers and, if
necessary, broadcasts a message to all producers to adjust their
rates corresponding to it as a target.

      The fundamental difference between our scheme and other pacing
schemes is that the producer controls the rate of message
transmission per unit time rather than sending messages up to some
limit (window) and then waiting for permission to send more.  It is
assumed that some messages will be lost by such a scheme and that
their recovery will be handled by higher level, end- to-end
processes.  In return for giving up a guarantee of no buffer
overruns, we gain the ability to transmit without incurring a
proportional overhead in acknowledgement messages and the ability to
limit messages from a consumer to broadcast adjustment messages to
all producers.  When the permitted rate of transmission is not
exceeded by any producer, then all messages from all producers flow
over the communication...