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Thermal Transfer Printing for Circuit Boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102891D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aulick, LO: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This invention is a novel method for printing a circuit pattern on a circuit board substrate. [One method presently used is to screen a pattern of conductive ink onto a circuit board substrate.] The ink is cured and the board is placed into an electroless plating bath. Copper is plated onto the conductive ink pattern during the electroless plating operation in an amount sufficient for conduction of electricity.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 73% of the total text.

Thermal Transfer Printing for Circuit Boards

      This invention is a novel method for printing a circuit pattern
on a circuit board substrate.  [One method presently used is to
screen a pattern of conductive ink onto a circuit board substrate.]
The ink is cured and the board is placed into an electroless plating
bath.  Copper is plated onto the conductive ink pattern during the
electroless plating operation in an amount sufficient for conduction
of electricity.

      This invention offers a new method of printing the uncured
conductive ink onto the surface of the circuit board substrate.

      The invention is a variation of thermal transfer printing
technology.  A properly designed, heavy-duty thermal element print
head is used along with a specially formulated ribbon to print the
desired circuit pattern directly onto the circuit board substrate.

      Normal print head control techniques are used to create the
desired circuit board pattern.  The ink is then cured completely
using either heat or radiation.  The circuit board is then plated and
components are attached using normal techniques.

      The printing system can be developed using conventional thermal
transfer technology, or resistive ribbon techniques could be
employed.  In either case, print heads and ribbons would need to be
modified to meet the demands of printing on a hard substrate.  The
ink can be a modification of the presently used conductive inks.  The
system also offers...