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Sputtering Target Gas Manifold Shield Box

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102907D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edmonson, DA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The figure illustrates tooling which satisfies the essential elements needed in the operation of a sputter electrode. These elements (a flux shaping uniformity aperture, a supply of ionizable gas, and a dark space shield) are combined in one assembly that is serviced offline. The device is shown with a cutaway view of a gas delivery tube 1 in the figure.

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Sputtering Target Gas Manifold Shield Box

      The figure illustrates tooling which satisfies the essential
elements needed in the operation of a sputter electrode. These
elements (a flux shaping uniformity aperture, a supply of ionizable
gas, and a dark space shield) are combined in one assembly that is
serviced offline.  The device is shown with a cutaway view of a gas
delivery tube 1 in the figure.

      The exact design of the mounting flange varies depending on the
configuration of the sputtering system, but in any case the design
consists of extending a dark space shield 3 normal to the target to a
distance as close to the substrate or substrate transport system as
tolerances permit.  A uniformity plate 4 is attached to the top of
shield box 3.  The closer the clearance between uniformity plate 4
and the substrate or substrate pallet, the more efficient the
assembly is at collecting stray flux which improves maintainability.
Like space shield 3, the entire assembly rests at ground potential.

      A gas delivery tube 1 is located just inside of uniformity
plate 4 near the corner it makes with shield box 3.  This is a
U-shaped tube, the two legs of which slide through holes in one end
and are captured by extending slightly out of holes on the other end.
The holes are drilled so that the flow is directed into the corner,
causing the gas stream to undergo at least two collisions before
entering the plasma.  This randomizes the mixture, minimizing any
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