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Liquid Light Homogenizer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102991D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Goodman, DS: AUTHOR

Abstract

Kaleidoscopic light homogenizers are used to improve uniformity in the illumination systems of optical projectors. Recently, such homogenizers have become required with high power lasers. Current kaleidoscopes are either hollow "mirror tunnels" or solid devices, employing total internal reflection. The solid unit has the advantages of total internal reflection and that dust collects only on exterior surfaces, from which it can be cleaned. Solid units suffer from the problems that particularly good material is required for high UV transmittance and that they may become browned and thereafter unusable.

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Liquid Light Homogenizer

      Kaleidoscopic light homogenizers are used to improve uniformity
in the illumination systems of optical projectors.  Recently, such
homogenizers have become required with high power lasers.  Current
kaleidoscopes are either hollow "mirror tunnels" or solid devices,
employing total internal reflection.  The solid unit has the
advantages of total internal reflection and that dust collects only
on exterior surfaces, from which it can be cleaned.  Solid units
suffer from the problems that particularly good material is required
for high UV transmittance and that they may become browned and
thereafter unusable.

      Described here is an alternative kaleidoscope, with the
advantages of the solid type, but which is less expensive, easier to
fabricate, and has a number of other advantages.

      This device is an elongated glass or fused silica cell, filled
with liquid, whose index approximately matches that of the cell.  If
the index match is exact, it behaves the same optically as a
homogeneous solid.

      The device is easily fabricated.  Four or six plates are joined
by gluing or welding.  The outside can then be figured and polished.
The shape and texture of the inner surfaces are unimportant, since
they are made invisible by index matching.  The device is economical,
since less low-absorption material is required than with a solid
tunnel.

      The liquid kaleidoscope provides a number of unique
possibilities.  D...