Browse Prior Art Database

Touch-Sensitive Overhead Foil Projector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102998D
Original Publication Date: 1990-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Williams, DD: AUTHOR

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a liquid crystal display device is combined with a touch-sensitive panel to provide high resolution overhead foil presentations driven by an associated personal computer.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 91% of the total text.

Touch-Sensitive Overhead Foil Projector

      A technique is described whereby a liquid crystal display
device is combined with a touch-sensitive panel to provide high
resolution overhead foil presentations driven by an associated
personal computer.

      Although component parts have been used in prior art, the
concept described herein is unique in that a high resolution
projection device is combined with a touch panel, that is computer
driven, to enable a presenter to provide interactive presentations.

      Designed to be used primarily in presentations involving large
audiences, the touch-sensitive overhead foil projector enables the
presenter to directly view the liquid crystal display (LCD) on the
overhead projector while the audience is viewing a greatly enlarged
version on an overhead screen.

      LCD device 10, as shown in the figure, has backlighting removed
from a high resolution device and replaced by the light source of
overhead projector 11.  Touch-sensitive panel 12 is added to LCD
device 10 to allow touching functions to be performed by the
presenter during the presentations.  Both LCD device 10 and touch
panel 12 are connected to a remote personal computer.  The personal
computer is programmed to communicate "foil" information to the the
projector.  Touch-sensitive panel 12 provides sequencing information
to enable the presenter to control the presentation.  This is
particularly useful when demonstrating touch-driven application
pro...