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An Effective Temperature Calibration Method for Rapid Thermal Process Tools

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103030D
Original Publication Date: 1990-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fredericks, EC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) is becoming more and more important in many semiconductor processing areas. Many furnace annealing processes today have been converted to RTP for the advantage of trading temperature for time. Among these processes include shallow implant annealing, source/drain activation, contact alloying, glass reflow, silicide formation, etc.

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An Effective Temperature Calibration Method for Rapid Thermal Process Tools

      Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) is becoming more and more
important in many semiconductor processing areas.  Many furnace
annealing processes today have been converted to RTP for the
advantage of trading temperature for time.  Among these processes
include shallow implant annealing, source/drain activation, contact
alloying, glass reflow, silicide formation, etc.

      The problem with the most RTP tools is how to ensure the
temperature distribution on the wafer surface is maintained
accurately within the engineering specifications. A method proposed
in this article will effectively solve this problem and provide an
easy way to calibrate the RTP tools.

      Experiments indicate that recrystallized materials such as
alloys, metals or silicon surface have different grain structure
change that can be easily visualized under a conventional microscope.
Therefore, depositing different metals, or metal alloys, with a
slight change of element compositions using separate dot masks on the
silicon wafer will form a temperature-monitoring wafer.  Since the
alloy melting points can be predetermined and the alloy composition
can be controlled to about 1%, different dot-sized masks can be used
to identify the different alloys with different melting points.  A
coarse alignment of the dot masks is needed in order to lay out the
dot pattern uniformly across the wafer.

      In general, by...