Browse Prior Art Database

Workstation Find and Execute Keyboard Instructions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103115D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gilbertsen, TA: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A set of complementary methods assisting the PC workstation user to find and execute keyboard instructions is described. Specifically, the find method allows the user to find key definitions on the emulated keyboard when they are attached to the host system or configuring their workstation. The execute function method allows the user, when they are attached to the host system, to execute functions by selecting them from a list rather than by issuing the keystroke combination they are assigned to on the emulated keyboard.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Workstation Find and Execute Keyboard Instructions

      A set of complementary methods assisting the PC workstation
user to find and execute keyboard instructions is described.
Specifically, the find method allows the user to find key definitions
on the emulated keyboard when they are attached to the host system or
configuring their workstation. The execute function method allows the
user, when they are attached to the host system, to execute functions
by selecting them from a list rather than by issuing the keystroke
combination they are assigned to on the emulated keyboard.

      This method enhances the emulator function by allowing the user
to easily send keys that are either hidden on or missing from the
emulated keyboard.  Specifically, the enhancements provide the
following two capabilities:
   1. Execute a function by selecting it from a list rather than
entering the key it is assigned to.
      2. Find all the keys assigned with a given definition.

      The first capability described is an enhancement to the current
design of the emulator's keystroking routine. Because this capability
requires communication with the host system, it is only available
when the user is attached to the host system.  Under traditional
architecture, keystroke information is received from the keyboard and
processed. Here, as shown in Fig. 1, the architecture is enhanced to
allow input information to be generated internally to the system and
processed as if it were obtained by receiving keyboard keystrokes.
In this way, when an item is selected from the list, there is special
processing performed before the information is sent to the last part
of the keystroke routine.  Therefore, the user can select a function
from the list and have it execute as if it were from the emulated
keyboard.

      The second c...