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An Alternative Component Identification Process for Populated Printed Circuit Boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103137D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Howle, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Complicated Printed Circuit Boards can contain hundreds of individual components. These Printed Circuit Boards typically have a target or number system printed onto the Printed Circuit Board to assist in component identification. Current methods of producing the identification system on Printed Circuit Boards involve 3 to 6 processes. A new method is described which produces the identification system using one manufacturing process.

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An Alternative Component Identification Process for Populated Printed Circuit Boards

      Complicated Printed Circuit Boards can contain hundreds of
individual components.  These Printed Circuit Boards typically have a
target or number system printed onto the Printed Circuit Board to
assist in component identification. Current methods of producing the
identification system on Printed Circuit Boards involve 3 to 6
processes.  A new method is described which produces the
identification system using one manufacturing process.

      The method uses dyes encapsulated in a medium which breaks
during exposure to light or energy from a particular wavelength or
source (Ultraviolet, Microwave, X-ray, Electron Beam, or other).
These encapsulated dyes are then mixed in with the protective coating
used to cover most complicated Printed Circuit Boards.  The
Protective Coating process is performed as usual.  Later, the Board
is exposed to light in the pattern of the identification system
desired.  The wavelength of the light is chosen to break down the
encapsulating medium of the dye.

      Several combinations of encapsulating mediums, wavelengths, and
dyes can be combined to produce several different identification
patterns on a single Printed Circuit Board.

      Disclosed anonymously.