Browse Prior Art Database

Fabrication of Patterns without a Mask using Laser Technology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103176D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Liniger, EG: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a laser beam is used to fuse thin patterns onto substrate materials, thereby eliminating the need for a mask. The concept forms the patterns by fixing the particles with a laser beam, rather than creating a pattern in a flocculant layer and then attaching the particles, as was done in previous processes.

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Fabrication of Patterns without a Mask using Laser Technology

      A technique is described whereby a laser beam is used to fuse
thin patterns onto substrate materials, thereby eliminating the need
for a mask.  The concept forms the patterns by fixing the particles
with a laser beam, rather than creating a pattern in a flocculant
layer and then attaching the particles, as was done in previous
processes.

      In the creation of metal patterns, the process consists of
first depositing a thin layer of metal particles, using a flocculant,
on the substrate surface that bonds the particles from a suspension.
With the metal particles formed as a layer, exposure to a laser beam
causes the particles to fuse together and bond onto the substrate,
forming a metal pattern.  Any particles not fused together are
removed through ultrasonic cleaning.

      Typically, as used in semiconductor integrated circuit
fabrication, copper particles are used to coat glass, polymide,
epoxy-glass composite, or sapphire onto an alumina substrate.  The
discrete patterns formed using this concept produced patterns having
dimensions in the 10 to 100 micron range.

      Similarly, the method also can be used, without the need for a
mask, for depositing patterned insulator materials onto metal.  In
this case, the laser is used to fuse the insulator particles.

      The concept is particularly applicable in the repair and
stitching of metallized substrates, since the method can b...