Browse Prior Art Database

New Encapsulants for Computer Chip And Circuit Protection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103179D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ferreiro, LM: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of computer or other electronic circuit chip encapsulation intended to protect the chip from inspection and copying once installed in computers or other electronic equipment.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

New Encapsulants for Computer Chip And Circuit Protection

      Disclosed is a method of computer or other electronic circuit
chip encapsulation intended to protect the chip from inspection and
copying once installed in computers or other electronic equipment.

      Today's chip encapsulation consists of either a polymeric film,
such as polyimide, or sputtered quartz applied on the chip either
before or after the connections to the package are completed.  The
purpose of the encapsulant is to seal the chip against environmental
hazards, such as humidity or other corrosive atmospheres.

      The encapsulants used today are both transparent and easy to
remove by plasma or wet etching, thereby making it easy to reveal the
chip and wiring design.

      What is disclosed here is the encapsulation of chips and wiring
circuits in very hard and impossible to etch materials, in wet or dry
environments, without raising the chip temperature to a level that
will totally or partially destroy the chip and/or metal
interconnects.

      Examples of materials suitable for this purpose include
sapphire or aluminum oxide, magnesium oxides, zirconium oxide, etc.,
all of which can be deposited at relatively low temperatures (below
380oC) and yet they cannot be removed by any means, except perhaps by
diamond grinding, without raising the substrate or chip temperature
above 1000oC. Deposition of these materials can be accomplished by
reactive sputtering, as an example, in...