Browse Prior Art Database

An Automated System for Thin Film Circuit Repair

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103241D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chen, CJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In this disclosure, we propose an automated system for repairing defects in thin film circuits. This system relies on the formation of a micro-plasma to remove organic debris from the defects and the subsequent deposition of metal on the defects via decomposition of organometallic compounds in a localized plasma.

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An Automated System for Thin Film Circuit Repair

      In this disclosure, we propose an automated system for
repairing defects in thin film circuits.  This system relies on the
formation of a micro-plasma to remove organic debris from the defects
and the subsequent deposition of metal on the defects via
decomposition of organometallic compounds in a localized plasma.

      The defective circuit is placed in a chamber into which various
gases may be introduced.  Electrical contact is made to the ends of
the net to allow 80 mA to 2.6 mA of alternating current to be passed
through the circuit.

      Initially the chamber is filled with a mixture of 10 - 200
mTorr of 1.95% CF4/O2 and 100 - 900 Torr of argon buffer gas.  At
voltages between 300 and 500 VAC, a localized discharge forms at
breaks in the line.  Such a reactive plasma etches any organic
residue from the region of the defect and simultaneously sputters the
copper line ends.

      The etchant gas is then replaced with 50 - 1000 mTorr of
gas-phase organometallic and 100 - 900 Torr of argon.  At discharge
voltages between 235 V and 500 V, metal deposition occurs at the
break which eventually forms a planar conducting bridge of a
dimension approximately equaling the line width.  Further deposition
by continued organometallic pyrolysis or electroless and electrolytic
plating restores the line to its original cross-section.

      The process has been applied to copper-dielectric systems where...