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Browse Prior Art Database

One-Step Mask Making

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103319D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Braren, B: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In general, mask making involves numerous steps and as a result is often very slow and painstaking. Typically, a pattern must be created either by electron-beam lithography or some similar generative process. The lithography involves a number of steps including exposure, developing and rinsing. To avoid these problems, high speed jet etching has been employed. Neutral solutions, for example NaNO3, are used as the electrolyte to make the masks.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 92% of the total text.

One-Step Mask Making

      In general, mask making involves numerous steps and as a result
is often very slow and painstaking.  Typically, a pattern must be
created either by electron-beam lithography or some similar
generative process.  The lithography involves a number of steps
including exposure, developing and rinsing.  To avoid these problems,
high speed jet etching has been employed.  Neutral solutions, for
example NaNO3, are used as the electrolyte to make the masks.

      To create this mask requires the following : 1) Programming of
a programmable moveable arm or table to move the workpiece in the
desired pattern. 2) Mounting of the workpiece in a cell facing a
NaNO3 jet stream of desired diameter (for example, 200 microns) with
the workpiece connected to the positive terminal of a high current
source. 3) A chamber to which the nozzle is attached and which serves
as a reservoir of nitrate solution, under pressure. The chamber
contains a counter electrode which is connected to the negative
terminal of the current source.  With the current turned on and a
current density on the order of 50 A/cm2, the computer program is
adjusted to move slowly when etching is desired.  When no etching is
required, the arm moves rapidly.  In this manner the etch current
does not have to be modulated and stays on during the entire period
of mask production.  Vertical etch rates of up to 20 microns per
second have been observed.  Depending on the potential difference
b...