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Using a Highlighter On Shared Computer Documents

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103344D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eisen, I: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a method to highlight words, phrases, lines, or sections of a shared read-only document stored on DASD. Current alternatives are (1) to print a hard copy and manually use a felt-tipped highlighter pen, or (2) to make a second copy on DASD and modify that copy with an editor that supports highlighting. It is costly to make personal copies (either printed or on DASD) for all the documents a user wishes to reference.

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Using a Highlighter On Shared Computer Documents

      This article describes a method to highlight words, phrases,
lines, or sections of a shared read-only document stored on DASD.
Current alternatives are (1) to print a hard copy and manually use a
felt-tipped highlighter pen, or (2) to make a second copy on DASD and
modify that copy with an editor that supports highlighting.  It is
costly to make personal copies (either printed or on DASD) for all
the documents a user wishes to reference.

      A new annotation function (called HIGHLIGHT) that allows users
to duplicate the function of a highlighter pen should be added to
current editor programs.

      Selecting HIGHLIGHT changes the mouse pointer to look like a
highlighter pen. When the user drags (holds mouse button1 down and
moves) this highlighter over an unhighlighted section of document
text, that text becomes highlighted.  When the user drags this
highlighter over a highlighted section of document text, the
highlighting disappears.  The highlighting could also be done with a
keyboard, using a combination of keys for marking blocks.

      The data (e.g., the start and end of highlighted string, color,
offsets to editor control blocks, etc.) used by the editor to
reproduce this effect is saved in a personal annotation file that
references the original read-only document.  Whenever the user wishes
to review a document that has been personally highlighted, the editor
uses the original document fi...