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Phone-Mail with Messages for Calling Party

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103352D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schick, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

This technique reduces the communication interchange between individuals trying to convey messages to one another. The parties need to make fewer calls to exchange pertinent information. The called party leaves a message in his/her, the called party's, phone-mail for a potential caller. When/if the expected caller calls, he/she receives the message from the called party's phone-mail. Costly "phone tag" delays are reduced.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 93% of the total text.

Phone-Mail with Messages for Calling Party

      This technique reduces the communication interchange between
individuals trying to convey messages to one another.  The parties
need to make fewer calls to exchange pertinent information.  The
called party leaves a message in his/her, the called party's,
phone-mail for a potential caller. When/if the expected caller calls,
he/she receives the message from the called party's phone-mail.
Costly "phone tag" delays are reduced.

      Disclosed is a technique in which the called party leaves a
message for a calling party in the called party's phone-mail
facility.

      A specific scenario helps.  A caller, Jack, needs to know when
Jill, the called party, will be available for a meeting.  Jill has
anticipated the call because of some prior communication.  She
therefore has left a message on her phone-mail for Jack.  When Jack
calls and phone-mail answers, he hears the usual phone-mail message
plus the words "If you expect a message in my phone-mail, please key
in your name (or some identification such as security code, or
employee number, or initials)."  The identification triggers the
phone-mail to scan messages which may have been left on the system by
Jill for Jack.  If there is such a message, it is read to Jack and
the communication is complete.

      This could be accomplished by Jill leaving a message in Jack's
phone-mail.  But if Jack does not have a phone-mail facility, then
repeated calls must...