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Post-Treatment of Adhesive Elastomers to Eliminate Surface Tack

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103373D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gipstein, E: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Acrylic rubber elastomers are invaluable vibration/damping materials. Unfortunately, after polymerization and curing, they are sticky and tacky due to incomplete polymerization and/or low glass transition temperatures of the resultant elastomers. Consequently, they attract debris during molding and machining operations and must be cleaned prior to use (i.e., assembly into a device). Organic solvents or detergent cleaning solutions cannot be used without seriously swelling the elastomer and affecting its mechanical properties.

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Post-Treatment of Adhesive Elastomers to Eliminate Surface Tack

      Acrylic rubber elastomers are invaluable vibration/damping
materials.  Unfortunately, after polymerization and curing, they are
sticky and tacky due to incomplete polymerization and/or low glass
transition temperatures of the resultant elastomers.  Consequently,
they attract debris during molding and machining operations and must
be cleaned prior to use (i.e., assembly into a device).  Organic
solvents or detergent cleaning solutions cannot be used without
seriously swelling the elastomer and affecting its mechanical
properties.

      Disclosed are two facile post-treatment methods for modifying
the elastomer surface so that its wettability, detergency and
hydrophobicity is increased; this allows effective cleaning of the
elastomer surface without alteration of the initial bulk mechanical
properties of the elastomer.  The two methods are: (1) electron beam
irradiation of the elastomer surface to produce a non-tacky skin; and
(2) electron beam induced polymerization of a thin film of reactive
monomer on the elastomer surface to form a polymeric skin.  The
latter method has the advantage that polymeric skins with a wide
variety of surface energies may be attached.

      Scotchdamp (Trademark of 3M Company) SJ 2015 X, an acrylic
elastomer, was electron beam exposed (120 kV) under N2 to 180 Mrad on
both sides; the depth of beam penetration was limited to 34% of the
bulk elastomer by irradia...