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Low-Density Interconnect Die with Embedded Passives

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103396D
Publication Date: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that integrates passive components and RF function blocks on low-density interconnect (LDI) dies. The disclosed method places the passives onto the backside of the die. Benefits include using less space on the die, increasing performance, and removing potential thermal stresses.

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Low-Density Interconnect Die with Embedded Passives

Disclosed is a method that integrates passive components and RF function blocks on low-density interconnect (LDI) dies. The disclosed method places the passives onto the backside of the die. Benefits include using less space on the die, increasing performance, and removing potential thermal stresses.

Background

Embedded passive technologies are important because there is a need to use smaller and thinner electronic devices (with improved performance and function), especially for mobile and hands-on communication equipment. Current embedded technologies focus on two implementations: Organic PKG and LTCC. However, both of these technologies have limitations for low-cost HVM solutions: 

§         Organic PKG can only use limited passive materials. For example, epoxy-based packages or circuit boards cannot be heated to above 300°C, so passive materials, which require high temperature processing, can not be used. For example, embedding high-k ceramic materials that require processing temperatures of 600-1000°C is impossible without a high-risk lamination process.

§         LTCC technology is limited due to its high processing temperature (~900o C). For example, epoxy-based passives (e.g. resistors and capacitors) can not be used. Also, the LTCC technology is very expensive for the HVM, due to the cost of raw ceramic materials and the high temperature process.

General Description

The disclosed method embeds passive components and RF functio...