Browse Prior Art Database

Connecting Logical Displays with "Mouseholes"

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103425D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Talley, TM: AUTHOR

Abstract

On systems with multiple displays, it is desirable to allow arbitrary logical connections between the physical screens such that the mouse can move from screen to screen without keystrokes. Some systems make the logical connection as a left, right, top, or bottom relationship and moving the mouse off the associated side of the screen. However, there are situations where such connections are not desirable. For example, some users may prefer that when on a given screen, that the mouse be constrained such that it cannot "run off:eq. the screen. A technique is needed to logically associate screens via an icon such the user moves to a particular icon to access a another physical screen. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Connecting Logical Displays with "Mouseholes"

      On systems  with multiple displays, it is desirable to allow
arbitrary logical  connections between  the physical screens such
that  the mouse  can move from screen to screen without keystrokes.
Some systems  make the logical connection as a left, right,  top, or
bottom relationship  and  moving  the mouse off the associated side
of the screen.  However, there are situations where such  connections
are  not desirable. For example,  some users  may prefer  that when
on a  given screen, that  the mouse be constrained  such that it
cannot "run off:eq. the screen.  A technique is needed to logically
associate screens  via an  icon such  the user  moves  to  a
particular icon to access a another physical screen.

                            (Image Omitted)

      "Mouseholes" offer  a solution to the problem described above.
Mouseholes are pairs of icons, each representing the end of  a
logical  "mouse tunnel"  between physical screens. To access  screen
B  from screen A, the user moves the mouse cursor to the mousehole on
screen A which is associated with screen B.  The mouse automatically
"runs" through the mouse tunnel and the cursor reappears on screen B
at the mousehole associated with screen A.   An  alternative approach
could require a  mouse click to cause the mouse to run through the
tunnel.

      Disclosed anonymously.