Browse Prior Art Database

Far-UV Light for Cleaning Surfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103514D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blum, S: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Many device structures require two surfaces to be joined with good electrical and/or mechanical connection. Such devices are well known in microelectronics, both in the circuitry and in packaging. In the processing of these devices, residues are often left at the connection sites, which prevent good electrical and mechanical connections. These surfaces may be cleaned of residue by striking them with ultraviolet light in the wavelength range less than 220 nm. Such irradiation can occur with or without a vacuum.

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Far-UV Light for Cleaning Surfaces

      Many device structures require two surfaces to be joined with
good electrical and/or mechanical connection.  Such devices are well
known in microelectronics, both in the circuitry and in packaging.
In the processing of these devices, residues are often left at the
connection sites, which prevent good electrical and mechanical
connections. These surfaces may be cleaned of residue by striking
them with ultraviolet light in the wavelength range less than 220 nm.
Such irradiation can occur with or without a vacuum.

      The surfaces can be comprised of different materials, including
metals, polymers, and semiconductors.  In particular, organic
residues are easily removed by this process.  The technique is
advantageous when other cleaning techniques, such as reactive ion
etching or plasma etching, are not easily accomplished.

      The technique is generally non-thermal, there being no heating
resulting from the far-UV radiation.  The radiation is used to break
chemical bonds to produce volatile byproducts which ablate.  The
residues are broken down into these volatile species in ambient gas
or in vacuum. Further, the technique may be applied in-situ, e.g., in
vacuum chambers, making it particularly useful in processes such as
molecular beam epitaxy.

      Disclosed anonymously.