Browse Prior Art Database

Recursive Keyboard Case Locks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103526D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Falkoff, AD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Keyboard entry which requires the use of multiple shifts in order to generate the desired input is usually accomplished by the often awkward or inconvenient process of depressing an auxiliary key and a character key at the same time. This disclosure is an enhancement to keyboards which provides a lock for a multiplicity of shift states, so that the proper input can be achieved without physically holding down an auxiliary key.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Recursive Keyboard Case Locks

      Keyboard entry which requires the use of multiple shifts in
order to generate the desired input is usually accomplished by the
often awkward or inconvenient process of depressing an auxiliary key
and a character key at the same time.  This disclosure is an
enhancement to keyboards which provides a lock for a multiplicity of
shift states, so that the proper input can be achieved without
physically holding down an auxiliary key.

      The invention provides the ability to lock a keyboard in any of
the shift states commonly available now only by holding down the
auxiliary keys, such as Shift, Alt, Ctrl, etc.  Present keyboards do
not provide this facility, even for the Shift, providing instead two
partial (but quite useful) locks: Caps Lock and Num Lock, which,
respectively, shift only the alphabetic keys and the number-pad keys.
There is no facility on modern electronic keyboards that corresponds
exactly to the shift lock on mechanical typewriter keyboards.

      The herein disclosed keyboard design includes a general Lock
key, which, when used in conjunction with one of the shift keys -- in
much the same way that a shift key is used in conjunction with a
character key -- will lock in that shift.  Thus, for example, if the
Alt key is used to produce an alternative set of characters (say, a
second alphabet residing in a different part of a code page, intended
to display or print in a different font), pressing the Alt while
h...