Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Avoiding Damage Caused by Rough Tweezer Tips

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103527D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Feger, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to smooth stainless steel tweezer tips to a mirror surface finish to minimize accidental damage of soft surfaces. The disclosed method involves electropolishing to remove protrusions and microroughness on the tweezer tip surface.

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Method of Avoiding Damage Caused by Rough Tweezer Tips

      Disclosed is a method to smooth stainless steel tweezer tips to
a mirror surface finish to minimize accidental damage of soft
surfaces.  The disclosed method involves electropolishing to remove
protrusions and microroughness on the tweezer tip surface.

      Tweezers with fine tips (in the order of 100 mm diameter) can
be used to pick up small items such as wire bonds from polymeric
insulator and other soft surfaces. Commercially available tweezers
have microscopically rough tips with protrusions and burrs in the
order of 10 mm. During manual manipulation such as picking up a wire
from a polymer surface, the tweezer tips slide over the surface. In
soft materials, i.e., materials softer than stainless steel, the
mentioned protrusions cause a cutting action during the pick-up which
can result in surface damage.

      The protrusions and surface roughness can be removed by
electropolishing.  Keeping the tweezers closed during this process
allows polishing of the outside of the tip while retaining the needed
roughness on the inside edge for gripping.  The electropolishing
process is a controlled electrolytic anodic etching of the metal.
Process set-up and execution are simple and cheap.  Batch processing
is possible.  Details of electrochemical polishing operations are
described in J. A. McGough, Principles of Electrochemical Maching,
Chapman and Hall, London, 1974.

      Disclosed anonymously ...