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Intelligent Radio Resource Management and Network Planning for Handling both Mobile Stations and Fixed Subscriber Stations in 3rd/4th Generation Broadband Wireless Systems and Beyond

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103542D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 5 Issue 4 (2005-04-16)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

New cellular Wireless Broadband Systems 3G (Third Generation) and beyond 3G such as HSDPA (High Speed Downlink Packet Access), WiMax (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) and others provide highest data rates of several megabit per second (Mbit/s) to certain users. The subscribers have to be either fixed subscriber station (SS) or mobile subscribers. In the first case, it is characterized by a more or less stationary installation of equipment at home. A directed high gain antenna is mounted close to the roof providing excellent radio conditions by good UL (uplink) and DL (downlink) receive level and high interference suppression. Furthermore, the UL transmit power is rather high, power supply problems do not occur. In the second case, the laptop is equipped with a conventional data card or Intel Centrino technology (product of Intel Corp.). The UL transmit power is rather low. The omnidirectional zero gain antenna does not provide good UL and DL receive level and any interference suppression capabilities. The laptop user suffers from indoor penetration loss and high pathloss due to the location close to the ground level. Since SS and MS have totally different properties a mixture of both in the same cellular network leads to severe problems. The coverage of SS and MS and the potential network load for SS and MS are totally different. Due to the interference suppression of the directed SS antenna a SS network can be loaded significantly higher. MS in such a SS network cannot survive due to the high interference level. So, a separation of MS and SS is required due to its different coverage and radio properties. Network planning and resource management can do the separation.

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Intelligent Radio Resource Management and Network Planning for Handling both Mobile Stations and Fixed Subscriber Stations in 3rd/4th Generation Broadband Wireless Systems and Beyond

Idea: Dr. Kolio Ivanov, DE-Munich; Dr. Carsten Ball, DE-Munich; Robert Muellner, DE-Munich;

Franz Treml, DE-Munich; Eduard Humburg, DE-Munich; Dr. Helmut Herr, DE-Munich

New cellular Wireless Broadband Systems 3G (Third Generation) and beyond 3G such as HSDPA (High Speed Downlink Packet Access), WiMax (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) and others provide highest data rates of several megabit per second (Mbit/s) to certain users. The subscribers have to be either fixed subscriber station (SS) or mobile subscribers. In the first case, it is characterized by a more or less stationary installation of equipment at home. A directed high gain antenna is mounted close to the roof providing excellent radio conditions by good UL (uplink) and DL (downlink) receive level and high interference suppression. Furthermore, the UL transmit power is rather high, power supply problems do not occur. In the second case, the laptop is equipped with a conventional data card or Intel Centrino technology (product of Intel Corp.). The UL transmit power is rather low. The omnidirectional zero gain antenna does not provide good UL and DL receive level and any interference suppression capabilities. The laptop user suffers from indoor penetration loss and high pathloss due to the location close to the ground level.

Since SS and MS have totally different properties a mixture of both in the same cellular network leads to severe problems. The coverage of SS and MS and the potential network load for SS and MS are totally different. Due to the interference suppression of the directed SS antenna a SS network can be loaded significantly higher. MS in such a SS network cannot survive due to the high interference level. So, a separation of MS and SS is required due to its different coverage and radio properties. Network planning and resource management can do the separation.

These problems in a mixed MS and SS cellular network will be solved by an intelligent RRM (Radio Resource Management) network planning described as follows. There are two possibilities for distinguishing SS and MS by the network. First, there is a signaling by SS and MS in...