Browse Prior Art Database

Cursor with Multi-dimensional Hotspot

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103706D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 3 page(s) / 147K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appino, PA: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article discloses a cursor for computer-generated environments with a multi-dimensional hotspot. The hotspot is defined on the underlying geometry of the cursor and can have multiple representations of varying dimensionality.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 49% of the total text.

Cursor with Multi-dimensional Hotspot

       This article discloses a cursor for computer-generated
environments with a multi-dimensional hotspot.  The hotspot is
defined on the underlying geometry of the cursor and can have
multiple representations of varying dimensionality.

      In general, a cursor is a graphical construct used to represent
the location of a pointing device on a computer screen.  A cursor
might be a 2D image, a 3D image (volume), or a 3D graphical object
(polyhedron).  Regardless of its representation, a cursor has a
specific geometry used to draw it on a computer screen.  A cursor's
geometry consists of a set of positions and connections.  Positions
represent a collection of n-dimensional points where n is the
dimensionality of the cursor.  The connections component of a
cursor's geometry defines how the positions are connected to create
the representation of the cursor.  For example, the positions
(pixels) of a 2D image cursor are connected on a square grid, e.g.,
each pixel is connected to its immediate neighbors.  Both the
positions and connections components of a cursor may be either
explicitly or implicitly defined (see Table 1).

      A multi-dimensional hotspot is specified on the geometry of its
parent cursor.  A hotspot also contains positions and connections
components.  Hotspot positions are a subset of its cursor's
positions.  A hotspot's connections may be the same or different than
its cursor's connections allowing for multiple representations of
varying dimensionality.  For example, possible hotspots for a 2D
image cursor include a single 0D point, a 1D line, or a 2D image.  As
with a cursor's geometry, the positions and connections components of
a hotspot may be either explicitly or implicitly defined.

      Table 1 describes the cursor and hotspot geometries for a 2D
image cursor and a polygon cursor.

      Although these examples are 2D cursors, the concept of a cursor
with a multi-dimensional hotspot obviously extends to higher
dimensions.  A 2D image cursor contains an implicit positions
component and an implicit connections component.  The positions are
defined by specifying the width and height of the image.  As
previously mentioned, the connections are assumed to be a square
grid.  Possible hotspots for a 2D image cursor inculde a single
point, a collection of points, a line, or a 2D image.  A point
hotspot is the standard hotspot implemented in graphical user
interfaces.  A points hotspot contains an array of (x,y) points
corresponding to pixel positions in the cursor image.  There are no
connections between the positions.  A line hotspot also contains an
array of (x,y) positions but there are implicit line segment
connections between each pair of points.  A 2D image hotspot
represents a subimage within the original cursor image.  It is
defined by an (x,y) offset into the cursor image, a width, and a
height.  The positions (pixels) in a 2D image ho...