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Method for Prioritizing Execution of Test Cases

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103735D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 3 page(s) / 114K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Faver, D: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The manufacturing box test process for the IBM RISC System/6000* utilizes a unique approach for prioritizing the execution of test cases. This article describes this approach.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Prioritizing Execution of Test Cases

       The manufacturing box test process for the IBM RISC
System/6000* utilizes a unique approach for prioritizing the
execution of test cases.  This article describes this approach.

      The manufacturing box test process, or box test, includes an
extended exercise of the system, usually referred to as run-in test.
During run-in test, the system is tested over an extended period of
time and subjected to multiple power cycles.  For example, a system
might be run-in tested for 9 power cycles of two hours each, with an
off time of 30 minutes between cycles.  This would result in a run-in
time of 22 hours.

      The manufacturing process for the IBM RISC System/6000* is
build to order.  In other words, the machine is built and tested
exactly as it is ordered by the customer.  Because of this, the
content of the system varies greatly from system to system.  For
example, one system may contain 6 hard disks and 8 different feature
cards, while another might contain a single hard disk and a single
feature card.  Cost and ease of use requirements force that a single
set of run-in parameters be used in spite of the varying content of
each system to be tested.

      The manufacturing test software uses 2 simple tables to deal
with the widely varying requirements on the run-in test.  The first,
often referred to as the SUTCON (System Under Test CONfiguration),
provides the system with the order and test information required to
test the system.  It is generated by a separate computer prior to
test using the customer's order information and several ASCII tables
which provide information pertinent to test case names, pallet
number, etc.  The key items provided in the SUTCON for test execution
are the number of occurrences of each device to be tested, the
operating system name of each device, the time required to test each
device in minutes, and the run-in time parameters.  Essential
information contained in the SUTCON is shown in the figure.

      The second table used to determine test case execution is
referred to as TESTCOUNT table.  During execution of the
manufacturing test, the manufacturing diagnostic controller (MDC) is
responsible for the calling of the test cases and the recording of
the...