Browse Prior Art Database

Track the Date Time of the Posting of Calendar Events

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103770D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Weber, OW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a method of resolving conflicts on the electronic calendar by tracking the date and time when calendar events are posted. When there are two or more calendar events scheduled for the same time on an electronic calendar, there is currently not a straightforward process to determine which event takes precedence over the others.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Track the Date Time of the Posting of Calendar Events

      Described is a method of resolving conflicts on the electronic
calendar by tracking the date and time when calendar events are
posted.  When there are two or more calendar events scheduled for the
same time on an electronic calendar, there is currently not a
straightforward process to determine which event takes precedence
over the others.

      One input to the determination of the order of precedence of
calendar events is the date and time when the event was posted.  If
the date and time when the event was posted were made available to
the calendar user for every event, the decision to prioritize one
event over another would be easier.

      This solution is a feature of the electronic calendar which
automatically saves the date and time when an event is posted to the
calendar.  When a meeting notice is received and posted to the
calendar, the date and time is saved in the data base for that event.
Then when the calendar is viewed, and a conflict is detected, the
user is given the option of viewing the date and time when each event
was posted, thus assisting in determining which event is more
important and should be pursued.  The conventional procedure is to
simply display the events in the order in which they are posted, but
this is not always indicative of what the user needs to know, since
events can be inserted manually in any order, so more information is
needed.

      Suppose John has...