Browse Prior Art Database

Variable Load DASD Head Suspension

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103856D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoyt, RF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The disclosed invention is shown in Fig. 1. It features two DASD head suspension which are mounted on an arm, facing away from each other, to the disk surfaces. For most DASD files there are several pairs of these head-disk combinations, allowing higher storage capacity. The disclosed suspensions are not pre-stressed, or bent as is usually the case, but are flat so that they lie in the plane of the mounting arm.

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Variable Load DASD Head Suspension

      The disclosed invention is shown in Fig. 1.  It features two
DASD head suspension which are mounted on an arm, facing away from
each other, to the disk surfaces.  For most DASD files there are
several pairs of these head-disk combinations, allowing higher
storage capacity.  The disclosed suspensions are not pre-stressed, or
bent as is usually the case, but are flat so that they lie in the
plane of the mounting arm.

      Between the two suspensions is a small transducer actuator
which can be expanded, applying equal and opposite force to each
suspension.  The transducer may be a small voice coil, piezoelectric
crystal, air plunger, or other device which will provide the
necessary loading force to the suspensions.  The force can be varied
to ensure that the heads fly at the correct spacing above the storage
medium.  In this case, it may be advantageous to use 2 separate
transducers (Fig. 2).

      For merging the heads and disk, the transducer is not powered,
and the heads are easily inserted between the disks.  During
operation, the transducer is actuated, and the loading process is
achieved.  When the DASD file is turned off, or it is desired to move
the heads from the disk surface, power is removed from the transducer
and the spring force of the suspension removes the heads from the
disks.