Browse Prior Art Database

Fail-Safe Method for Assured Sub-Process Start

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103874D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carlsen, K: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a tending daemon to confirm sub-process initialization that uses a handshaking method to reduce wait loops.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 73% of the total text.

Fail-Safe Method for Assured Sub-Process Start

      Disclosed is a method for a tending daemon to confirm
sub-process initialization that uses a handshaking method to reduce
wait loops.

      In a distributed client/server based file backup and restore
environment, different services are provided by individual daemons
that handle requests made by client operations.  On a given node in
the system, one or more daemons may be running in the background,
providing services such as message handling and inventory database
transactions to all other nodes in the system.  To assure that the
daemons on a given node are maintained and to provide a common method
for controlling all such services via a remote procedure call
interface, a tending daemon is put in place to handle startup,
shutdown, and error recovery/restart of all other services.

      One of the tending daemon's primary functions is to start each
service that should be running on its local node.  Each service must
be confirmed as functioning before the tending daemon can
successfully return from an initialization request.  The tending
daemon first starts a local service provider by executing the service
as a sub-process.  To avoid having to always wait a pre-specified
amount of time before the tender can confirm the service is actually
network accessible, each service generates an "OK" signal that is
sent to its parent, the tender, as soon as it is ready to handle
requests.  Therefore, after the tende...