Browse Prior Art Database

Relative Alias Extraction Methodology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103875D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bugg, A: AUTHOR [+10]

Abstract

In a UNIX* environment, a given file may be 'known' by a number of different names (aliases). These names are relative, e.g., they are not fully qualified with respect to actual file location. In a distributed archive/retrieve backup/restore file server system, the aliasing schema must resolve all aliases into alias lists (alists). The file names have no meaning without their directory context.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Relative Alias Extraction Methodology

      In a UNIX* environment, a given file may be 'known' by a number
of different names (aliases).  These names are relative, e.g., they
are not fully qualified with respect to actual file location.  In a
distributed archive/retrieve backup/restore file server system, the
aliasing schema must resolve all aliases into alias lists (alists).
The file names have no meaning without their directory context.

      A relative name is associated with an alias by converting the
relative name to a node absolute name (e.g., a name which traces to a
particular root directory).  The alias string is then referenced to
the absolute name one time for an 'n' alias grouping.

      The UNIX environment provides a means in which a single file
can be referenced locally or globally by any name.  The nature of the
file construct (inode definition), is not affected by this mechanism,
however.  Therefore, additional file specific information must be
resolved and recorded within an inventory in order to properly
recover a file.

      The alist construct is generated by interrogating the current
alias reference string within memory.  An in-memory list is
generated, with the base name resolved to an absolute, root-based
directory definition.  The alist construct is then compressed into
transportable form, and preserved as an object of the file state
definition in the controlled inventory.

      In this way, aliases are preserved for subsequent extraction
during a file recovery operation.  The method provides a means of
defining common aliases which otherwise would be ambiguous relative
to a specific file system.

      This set of operations represents a unique schema for
reconciling ambiguous names to a specific file construct and
directory location w...