Browse Prior Art Database

Improving Handwriting Ability via Automatic Handwriting Recognition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000103893D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 87K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bellegarda, JR: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is an interface for helping students to learn, improve, and maintain their handwriting skills. The method is based on using Automatic Handwriting Recognition for providing users with instantaneous, objective feedback on the quality of their handwriting. For children the interface can be organized in the form of a game.

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Improving Handwriting Ability via Automatic Handwriting Recognition

      Disclosed is an interface for helping students to learn,
improve, and maintain their handwriting skills.  The method is based
on using Automatic Handwriting Recognition for providing users with
instantaneous, objective feedback on the quality of their
handwriting.  For children the interface can be organized in the form
of a game.

      Currently, to correct their manner of writing, students
learning how to write need constant supervision from a teacher.  This
essentially limits the amount of time that they can spend acquiring
and improving their handwriting ability.  Also it is difficult for
the teacher to provide objective feedback to every student regarding
the work.  The reasons for this are due to the following:

1.    Perfect handwriting is characterized by many topological and
    dynamic characteristics.  The teacher can focus on only a few of
    the most obvious deficiencies in the student's handwriting while
    leaving many other discrepancies without attention.

2.    Some dynamic characteristics (such as the direction in which
    letters are written and from what point they are started) cannot
    be determined from the resulting handwriting.  They can only be
    observed if the teacher supervises a single student during the
    whole writing session.  This is impractical and expensive.

      In addition, the current procedure for learning to write is
rather boring for children, which has a negative impact on their
ability to develop good cursive handwriting.

      The disclosure presents a method to assist students in
developing better cursive handwriting.  It is based on an interface
that provides automatic visual and audio feedback in response to
student input.  The automatic feedback is based on Automatic
Handwriting Recognition (AHR) algorithms, and the interface can be
organized in the form of a game.

      Schematically the use of AHR in this context can be described
as follows:
A user is asked to write some word (by being prompted either
pictorially or in typeface).  The word is written on a tablet with a
special pen and the AHR decodes this word.  If it is decoded
correctly, the user is gratified in some way, such as moving to the
next step, hearing a pleasant melody, etc. Otherwise, the user
receives negative feedback proportional to the quality of the
decoding relative to the source word.

      Using AHR to provide feedback...