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Browse Prior Art Database

Visual Indicator of Spelling Error Locations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104015D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 1 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schell, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Techniques are disclosed that allow users to visually and quickly locate spelling errors within a large document without having to scroll through each page. In current systems, when a user chooses to spell-check a whole document, the system typically highlights all of the misspelled words in the document and the user must then page through the document looking for the highlighted words to correct. Other spell-checkers are always on and highlight misspelled words as they occur. However, users may choose to correct the mistakes after they are finished typing the document. With either implementation, users must scan the document to find the errors. There is no way to visually see how many errors the document contains or to quickly locate and access them.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 87% of the total text.

Visual Indicator of Spelling Error Locations

      Techniques are disclosed that allow users to visually and
quickly locate spelling errors within a large document without having
to scroll through each page.
     In current systems, when a user chooses to spell-check a whole
document, the system typically highlights all of the misspelled words
in the document and the user must then page through the document
looking  for the highlighted words to correct.  Other spell-checkers
are always on and highlight misspelled words as they occur.  However,
users may choose to correct the mistakes after they are finished
typing the document.  With either implementation, users must scan the
document to find the errors.  There is no way to visually see how
many errors the document contains or to quickly locate and access
them.
     A technique is disclosed that would provide users with a visual
cue as to location of each error in the document and a means to
immediately access that error.  Users would invoke the spell-check
function in the typical manner and the system would highlight the
spelling errors using existing techniques.  However, the scroll bar
associated with the document would be enhanced to include visual
markers corresponding to the location of the spelling errors.  By
visually inspecting the scroll bar, the user could determine how many
spelling errors the document contained and their relative location in
the document.  To access any of the errors, the u...