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High Saturation Induction Multilayer Fe(N)/NiFeCo Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104049D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jones Jr, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A new magnetic material is described having a high saturation induction, near-zero magnetostriction and low coercivities. It can be used to fabricate high resolution inductive film heads for use with high coercivity media.

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High Saturation Induction Multilayer Fe(N)/NiFeCo Materials

      A new magnetic material is described having a high saturation
induction, near-zero magnetostriction and low coercivities.  It can
be used to fabricate high resolution inductive film heads for use
with high coercivity media.

      Films with iron as a major constituent are good film head
materials because iron has the highest saturation induction, about
2.2 Tesla, of any element.  However, pure iron films with thicknesses
of 1um or greater, as required for film heads, have coercivities, Hc,
that are too high, typically greater than 1 Oe.  One technique for
reducing Hc is to reduce the average grain size by interrupting the
growth of the body centered cubic iron grains with a layer of
dissimilar material, for example, face centered cubic NiFe permalloy.
If the iron layers are kept in the order of 500A thick, Hc can be
reduced to about 0.3 Oe in this way.  Another technique for reducing
Hc is by RF sputtering the iron films in argon-nitrogen.  Nitrogen
incorporation lowers Hc, adjusts the magnetostriction closer to zero,
and improves corrosion resistance [1].

      Disclosed are the advantages of multilayer iron films sputter
deposited in argon-nitrogen, Fe(N), with alternate layers of NiFeCo.
The NiFeCo films are chosen to provide near-zero magnetostriction
with a composition close to that of permalloy (about 81%Ni/19%Fe),
but with cobalt added.

      With Fe(N)/NiFe the anisotropy field...