Browse Prior Art Database

Cross-Application Staple Function with "Stapled" Indicator/Icon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104150D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Melkus, LA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique to implement a cross-application staple function to allow users to work with and directly manipulate objects that have been stapled together across differing applications. The technique is implemented as follows:

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Cross-Application Staple Function with "Stapled" Indicator/Icon

      Disclosed is a technique to implement a cross-application
staple function to allow users to work with and directly manipulate
objects that have been stapled together across differing
applications.  The technique is implemented as follows:

1.  Items are stapled together using the Stapler icon, a direction
    manipulation technique to attach objects together.  Items can be
    attached in the following ways:

    o   Drag and Drop - with this technique, users select the objects
        to be stapled together and then drag and drop them on the
        stapler icon.

    o   Drag Over - this technique is used when users want to attach
        objects together and follow immediately with another direct
        manipulation action.  For example, to staple two items
        together and send them, the user could select the objects,
        drag them over the stapler icon, and then drop them on a
        mailbox icon.

    o   Action-object drag and drop - with this technique, the user
        picks up the stapler icon and drags it over or drops it on
        objects he or she wishes to staple together.

2.  When viewed, items that have been stapled to something appear
    with a "staple" icon next to them (see 1a in the figure).  All
    staples, when originally viewed, appear in the same color.

3.  If the user single-clicks on the staple, the color of that staple
    and all of the staples of items attached to the selected item
    changes.  The new color is uniquely identifiable, either because
    it is different from the color of unselected staples or other
    previously selected staples, or because previously selected
    staples return to the unselected color.  Additionally, a
    technique may be used which employs straight-legged staples for
    unselected items and bent-legged staples for selected items (see
    1b in the figure).  These techniques allow users to easily
    determine which items are stapled together and apply regardless
    of the application where the item resides. ...