Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Supporting the Mechanical Detection of Name Fields in Forms

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104152D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Friede, K: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The described method supports the mechanical detection of personal fields in forms, such as those used for the name (surname and first name), place of residence, and street.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Supporting the Mechanical Detection of Name Fields in Forms

      The described method supports the mechanical detection of
personal fields in forms, such as those used for the name (surname
and first name), place of residence, and street.

      The number of entries to be detected in the different name
fields of forms is not arbitrary but limited, as for instance in the
case of first names, by registry office lists of potential names.
Therefore, an obvious approach is to compare a form entry with a list
of potential names or to use the frequency with which letters occur
as a basis for checking.

      For personal names, a distinction has to be drawn between the
family name and the name by which a person is generally known,
because linguistically, both names differ in the way they are formed.

      A name lexicon may be used to support the mechanical detection
of family names.  One hundred of the most frequent family names
account for 70 to 80 % of all German family names.  The volume of the
name lexicon depends on the detection quality required, although
about 2000 to 3000 entries would suffice to handle about 95 to 97 %
of all cases.

      Additionally, frequency ratings for letters and letter
combinations are provided from a body of family names, which serve as
a detection means for all those names not contained in the lexicon.

      First names and names by which persons are generally known are
handled in the same way as family names.

      As some family names and names by which persons are known are
identical, such names would also have to be stored as family names.
All first names used as family names constitute a finite quantity.
They are marked accordingly in a list of first names and are
available for surname checks.

      Place name...