Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Desktop Environments Reflected in Local Desktop Windows

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104191D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-18
Document File: 6 page(s) / 219K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Currently, every workstation must have an attached display and keyboard for a user to perform desktop operations on that workstation. Local Area Network (LAN) Server machines are often physically located remotely from the persons administrating them. In order to perform any operation or inspect the current situation on a LAN Server machine the administrator must physically be at the machine's location. Often when a problem occurs an administrator doesn't know which of the many machines is causing the problem and must physically inspect each one in turn until the problem is found.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 29% of the total text.

Remote Desktop Environments Reflected in Local Desktop Windows

      Currently, every workstation must have an attached display and
keyboard for a user to perform desktop operations on that
workstation.  Local Area Network (LAN) Server machines are often
physically located remotely from the persons administrating them.  In
order to perform any operation or inspect the current situation on a
LAN Server machine the administrator must physically be at the
machine's location.  Often when a problem occurs an administrator
doesn't know which of the many machines is causing the problem and
must physically inspect each one in turn until the problem is found.

      This invention involves a communication application making use
of OS/2*, NETBIOS, Presentation Manager* (PM) and works in concert
with OS/2's Local Area Network Server and Requester applications.

      This invention describes a method whereby a single workstation
running OS/2 and connected to a Local Area Network (LAN) can display
a remote workstation's desktop environment in a window.  The local
workstation user displaying the remote desktop environment in a local
window can perform actions on the remote desktop.  The actions
available to the local desktop user include all those available to
the remote desktop user and more.

      This invention describes a method whereby a single workstation,
running OS/2 and connected to a Local Area Network (LAN), can display
a remote workstation's desktop environment in a window.  The local
workstation user displaying the remote desktop environment in a local
window can perform actions on the remote desktop.  The actions
available to the local desktop user include all those available to
the remote desktop user and more.  Fig. 1 shows an overview of this
invention.

      The term desktop environment is described here as the whole of
the information given on a workstation's display.  If the workstation
is displaying information from a full screen application, that is
considered the desktop environment.  If the Presentation Manager is
the active application, that is considered the desktop environment.
If the workplace shell is active, that would also be considered the
desktop environment.

      This invention requires coordination between the remote and
local workstations.  This coordination occurs across a Local Area
Network (LAN).

      The remote workstation provides the desktop environment
supplier function via the Desktop Environment Service (DES) Manager
application.  A Desktop Environment Interpreter Device Driver (DEIDD)
is installed and runs in the DES workstation.  The DEIDD interprets,
correlates, reflects and acts upon the desktop environment of its
workstation at the request of the DES.  All information received by
the DES from the DEIDD is further translated and filtered into a
usable means and passed through the LAN to all local requesting
workstations.

      The DEIDD is tightly couple...