Browse Prior Art Database

Assigning Priority for Calendar Events

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104261D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Weber, OW: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a method of resolving conflicts on the electronic calendar by allowing the user to assign a priority to any event on the calendar. When there are two or more events on the electronic calendar that are scheduled for the same time, there is not a straightforward process to determine which event takes precedence over the others. One input to the determination of the order of precedence of calendar events is the priority the user gives to each event. When the two meetings seem to be of equal importance, the decision of which meeting to attend may have to be made based upon which one the user feels is most important, but there is no way to show this priority on the calendar.

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Assigning Priority for Calendar Events

      This article describes a method of resolving conflicts on the
electronic calendar by allowing the user to assign a priority to any
event on the calendar.  When there are two or more events on the
electronic calendar that are scheduled for the same time, there is
not a straightforward process to determine which event takes
precedence over the others.  One input to the determination of the
order of precedence of calendar events is the priority the user gives
to each event.  When the two meetings seem to be of equal importance,
the decision of which meeting to attend may have to be made based
upon which one the user feels is most important, but there is no way
to show this priority on the calendar.

      This invention is a feature of the electronic calendar which
allows the user to assign a priority to each event.  For example,
suppose there have been no events posted to the calendar for July 1,
1992.  Then, Meeting Notice A is received and posted to the calendar
for July 1.  Then Meeting Notice B is posted for July 1 at the same
time as Meeting A.  Since the two meetings have the same start time,
the electronic calendar displays them in the order in which they were
received, Meeting A first, followed by Meeting B.  The user
recognizes the conflict and the order in which they appear, and
he/she determines that Meeting B is more important than Meeting A.
However, the problem remains that there is no way for the user...