Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Combination Address Book

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104266D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill, LM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In current office systems, users typically have both a shared address book and a personal address book. The shared address book is read-only to the end user. Only the administrator can add, change or delete entries. The personal address book resides on the user's workstation and the user is able to add and delete entries, copy entries from the shared address book and make changes to existing entries.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 89% of the total text.

Dynamic Combination Address Book

      In current office systems, users typically have both a shared
address book and a personal address book.  The shared address book is
read-only to the end user.  Only the administrator can add, change or
delete entries.  The personal address book resides on the user's
workstation and the user is able to add and delete entries, copy
entries from the shared address book and make changes to existing
entries.

      A technique is disclosed that would allow users to access a
dynamic Combination Address Book that would display merged entries
from both the shared address book and the personal address book.  The
Combination Address Book would be accessed as an icon on the desktop
but would not represent an actual database of entries.  Rather it
would represent a dynamic search list of entries from both the shared
address book and the personal address book.  That is, when the user
selects the Combination Address Book icon, the system pulls all
entries from the user's personal address book, all entries from the
shared address book, merges and checks for duplicates, and displays
the combined list to the user.

      The displayed entries would be color-coded to indicate their
source.  For example, entries that were obtained from the shared
address book would appear in one color, entries from the personal
address book would appear in another color, and entries that were
located in both sources, would appear as a third color.  Th...