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Faster Deposition of Sputter Carbon Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104285D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kaufman, JH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for increasing the rate of sputter deposition of carbon films (for protective disk overcoats), and for chromium films (underlayers). The deposition rate is increased by applying low frequency rf (100-400KHz) bias to the substrate.

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Faster Deposition of Sputter Carbon Films

      Disclosed is a process for increasing the rate of sputter
deposition of carbon films (for protective disk overcoats), and for
chromium films (underlayers).  The deposition rate is increased by
applying low frequency rf (100-400KHz) bias to the substrate.

      In many manufacturing tools used to produce cobalt alloy thin
film disk structures, different layers which make up the disk
structure are deposited in sequential subchambers.  It is important
that the sputter deposition time for these steps be similar although
rates and thicknesses for the different layers may differ.  For
example, because carbon sputtering (e.g. for H carbon) is
comparatively slow compared to deposition of other materials, two or
even three subchambers must be dedicated to depositing the full
overcoat thickness (200-300 angstroms).  Using three stations for
carbon increases the production rate.  Unfortunately it also limits
the number of other processes that can be implemented in each of the
production machines which have a limited number of substations.

      Similarly, increasing the rate of metal film deposition (e.g. a
Cr underlayer) when thick films are required (e.g. 1000 angstroms) is
also a problem as sputtering with higher power to the sputter source
can cause spitting of the target and defects on the disks.

      A low frequency (100-400KHz) rf bias applied to the disk
substrates increases the deposition rate dramatical...