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Browse Prior Art Database

Hand-Held Device for Cursor Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104293D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rutledge, JD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a hand-held device for controlling the motion of a cursor (or pointer) for mouse-controlled interfaces. The device can be operated by one hand, the motion of the cursor being controlled by tilting the device. Thus the control is not restricted, as is a mouse, to being on a surface, and thus gives the user greater freedom of motion and position.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 98% of the total text.

Hand-Held Device for Cursor Control

      Disclosed is a hand-held device for controlling the motion of a
cursor (or pointer) for mouse-controlled interfaces.  The device can
be operated by one hand, the motion of the cursor being controlled by
tilting the device.  Thus the control is not restricted, as is a
mouse, to being on a surface, and thus gives the user greater freedom
of motion and position.

      The device consists of a two-dimensional force detector, with a
weight attached to it, mounted in a container in such a manner that
the detector measures that portion of the gravitational force on the
weight that lies in the plane to which the force detector is
sensitive.  Thus tilting the container results in a signal being
generated by the force detector which is then used to control the
motion of the cursor.  The container is sized and shaped so as to
comfortably hand-held and may have additional input devices, such as
"mouse buttons," mounted on it.  While the existing embodiment uses a
wire to transmit the signal from the device to a computer or
terminal, it is envisioned that this could be accomplished by radio,
or some similar means, not requiring an "umbilical cord."

      In the preferred embodiment, the two-dimensional force detector
is an isometric joy stick with a weight attached to the top of the
stick, and the signal from the isometric joy stick is fed into
circuitry which controls the velocity of the cursor as a function of
the force.

Dis...