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User Interaction Modes for Graphical User Interfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104331D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 1M

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gibson, GA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed are two new user interaction styles for graphical user interfaces. The first style provides a means for the user to easily switch back and forth between different authority levels to do a task. The second style provides a means for the user to work with complex object components in a consistent, uniform manner.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

User Interaction Modes for Graphical User Interfaces

      Disclosed are two new user interaction styles for graphical
user interfaces.  The first style provides a means for the user to
easily switch back and forth between different authority levels to do
a task.  The second style provides a means for the user to work with
complex object components in a consistent, uniform manner.

      In the first style, the user can depress a button that
represents the highest level of authority.  See Fig. 1 for the button
with the Wizard hat with "SA" on the hat brim.  (This figure depicts
the view that is shown when the button is depressed.)  Once the user
selects this button, the entire view of the task expands to reflect
the wizard view of the task.  This view is predetermined by the
system, and consists of objects and actions that this mode has the
authority to manipulate (usually more than the lower authority
levels).  The actions are arranged on a palette beside the primary
window.  The objects are arranged in the primary window to show their
interrelationships.

      If the user depresses the button again, the view goes back to
the general user view.  The number and type of objects change
according to the user authority level.  In this model, it is not
necessary for the user to login in separate windows.  The user is
able to switch back and forth at will.  Users with NO high level
authority will be able to view the tasks as if they had authority.
Users WITH authority will be able to view AND do the task.

      This interaction model provides a consistent, and uniform way
for users to do tasks that require different authority permissions.

      In the second embodiment, Fig. 2 shows objects in the primary
window; these objects already exist in the system and are displayed
with their associated names.  Object buttons appear at the top of the
primary win...