Browse Prior Art Database

Methodology for Georgraphical Peripheral Access

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104344D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jackson, BK: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Current office systems allow users to print documents by specifying the printer ID of the peripheral printer device. Some enterprises typically use a naming convention for the printer ID that is associated with the printer type and location. However, these peripheral devices are often relocated, thus changing their association with the location. It is advantageous to provide a method by which the user can specify the characteristic of the device's location and to have this location be associated with the device's identification, e.g., printer ID.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Methodology for Georgraphical Peripheral Access

      Current office systems allow users to print documents by
specifying the printer ID of the peripheral printer device.  Some
enterprises typically use a naming convention for the printer ID that
is associated with the printer type and location.  However, these
peripheral devices are often relocated, thus changing their
association with the location.  It is advantageous to provide a
method by which the user can specify the characteristic of the
device's location and to have this location be associated with the
device's identification, e.g., printer ID.

      Prior art allows for users to be prompted to enter correct IDs,
however the user must still scan among printers to determine the
correct printer at the correct location.  This problem is especially
prevalent for the traveling user who is at a strange location and
does not know the names nor conventions for identifying printers.

      This article describes a method by which the user can specify a
printer or peripheral device by its location.  For example, a user
could be prompted with the building, floor, room and device of the
printer.  Thus, the user does not need to be cognizant of the
printer's name.  This further allows the user to specify partial
information on a printer to be copied in an electronic calendar
system, users may be cognizant of the fact that they do not know the
address of a calendar user.  However, users may possess some
information on the location of the printer.  Users in such situations
would appreciate a service that allows for printer IDs to be
specified by location.

      A Query Printer Service prompts the user for physical
geographical information of the printer.  This service can be invoked
upon an error of a specifi...