Browse Prior Art Database

Selective Panel Electroplating Cabinet

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104388D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Robertson, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Proposed is a method of selective electroplating of two metals such as nickel and gold upon printed circuitry (including flexis) which economises in manufacturing floor space. Other benefits are increased plating speed, ease of use, lower capital outlay and suitability for full automation by solution and plating current control for uniform plating thickness.

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Selective Panel Electroplating Cabinet

      Proposed is a method of selective electroplating of two metals
such as nickel and gold upon printed circuitry (including flexis)
which economises in manufacturing floor space.  Other benefits are
increased plating speed, ease of use, lower capital outlay and
suitability for full automation by solution and plating current
control for uniform plating thickness.

      A panel (2) to be selectively electroplated is plated in a
holding frame (1) in a cabinet (of polypropylene, PVC etc) with the
areas to be plated (3) facing out.  A front panel (4) of clear
perspex hinges up to close the cabinet (7).  This front panel has on
it spray nozzles (5) which spray the primary (nickel) electroplating
solution (6) at the areas to be plated, via a pump (9), sump tank
(10) and a DC power supply which is pre-set to the correct current.
Since the plating solution is sprayed, the plating can be done in a
very short time (1 - 2 minutes).  The pump is then turned off and
spray rinse bars (not shown) above the cabinet turn on to purge the
system.  The second plating step (eg gold) then takes place in a
similar manner in the same cabinet.  A rotating drain outlet (8)
feeds the effluent to the correct sump (10 or 11).  This system would
be several times faster per plated panel than conventional systems
and would require only a fraction of the floor space.  Chemical
inventory stocks are also reduced as smaller reservoirs of plating
soluti...