Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Cardiologist Multimedia System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104413D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Zlotnick, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method using multimedia technology to aid cardiologists. By providing convenient access to synchronized digital recordings of audio, blood pressure, and electric signals of the heart, the proposed system improves the physicians' ability to perform research, diagnose, and track heart disease. In many cases a change in such signals over a time period is important information.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Cardiologist Multimedia System

      Disclosed is a method using multimedia technology to aid
cardiologists.  By providing convenient access to synchronized
digital recordings of audio, blood pressure, and electric signals of
the heart, the proposed system improves the physicians' ability to
perform research, diagnose, and track heart disease.  In many cases a
change in such signals over a time period is important information.

      Computerized systems for storing heart originated electric
signals (ECGs) are used in many hospitals.  Some of these systems
even try to analyze the signals, but with limited success.  Audio
signals are also captured in devices that monitor child births but
such devices do not normally store these signals.  Blood pressure is
also electrically monitored and presented as a graph.

      A proposed system uses available technology to capture audio,
blood pressure, and electric signals from the heart.  These signals
are then compressed, and stored on magnetic or optical media, along
with the routine patient information.  Several types of playback and
display facilities are used for output.  Audio signals may be played
back through a speaker, headphones, or displayed as graphs or images
on a CRT.  Blood pressure and electric signals are displayed as
graphs or images on a CRT.  It is also possible to construct a video
visualization of the heart by combining several electric signals
captured by different electrodes at the same time.  In all playback
modes the signals presented to the cardiologist are synchronized with
respect to acquisition time, or with respect to each other, according
to the physicians request.  The signals can also be sped up or slowed
down to suit a physician's need.  In particular Time Domain Harmonic
Scaling (TDHS) technology can be utilized for slow motion playback of
the audio signals, still in syn...