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Browse Prior Art Database

Scroll Control Box

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104430D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 6 page(s) / 211K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DeWid, RD: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a windowing software environment, especially graphical interfaces, screen space and screen clutter are continual problems for both the user and the program designer. The need for diverse scrolling operations is common. Diversity includes scroll direction, speed, distance, "other" data chunks, flexibility in operation while visually scanning, etc. In windowing environments, these needs are potentially common for every scrollable window, and even for multiple scrollable objects within a window. Today's graphical or non-graphical scroll operators demand extensive screen space. For example:

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Scroll Control Box

      In a windowing software environment, especially graphical
interfaces, screen space and screen clutter are continual problems
for both the user and the program designer.  The need for diverse
scrolling operations is common.  Diversity includes scroll direction,
speed, distance, "other" data chunks, flexibility in operation while
visually scanning, etc.  In windowing environments, these needs are
potentially common for every scrollable window, and even for multiple
scrollable objects within a window.  Today's graphical or
non-graphical scroll operators demand extensive screen space.  For
example:

o   OS/2* scroll bars require about 8% of the useable space of each
    window.

o   Other scroll mechanisms, i.e., PF Keys, Icon Arrows, Screen Push
    buttons, in the industry are:

    -   inconsistently applied
    -   are part of cluttered interfaces
    -   require learning, relearning
    -     require much screen space because packaging of scroll
        functions are inefficient

o   much graphical interface complexity of function in addition to
    scrolling.

o   current scrolling is inefficient and insufficient.

o   new scrolling function difficult to add gracefully.

      The Scroll Control Box (SCB) is a graphical object shown on a
display screen which, singly, is used to do all scrolling operations.
The SCB gives the user the capability, with one action (drag), to
indicate what is to be scrolled.  Also, with single action
(point/slide), a user can do all of the following:

o   Select one of 10 possible directions of scrolling on the x-y axis
    8 compass points (N, NE, E...) and two directions on the y axis
    (depth), activated by pressure.
o   Control the scroll speed or how large the scroll increments.
o   Change direction, speed, and distance during this single action.

o   Scroll any objects on screen by moving and placement of the SCB.

      The user operates the SCB using a touch instrument (finger,
stylus), or mouse or mouse-like device, a keyboard or other cursor
operating device in much the same way icons and other graphical
objects are operated on today.  SCB dimensions, i.e., of speed,
distance, etc., are customizable.

Results:

o   Small footprint of the one SCB compared with other scroll
    methods, e.g., one or several scroll bars
o   Efficient, all direction and dimensional controls in one place
    with two, three, or more controls for each of 10 directions
o   Simple to learn and remember
o   Can be placed by user
o   Single control for any scrollable area on a display screen
o   Flexible design can use combinations that are useful and most
    usable, e.g., using pressure for speed and sliding for going from
    one data chunk to another
o   Efficient, a "point-to-select" technique

      The quadrant or area in Fig. 1 containing the term "text up"
defines where mouse, touch, cursor, o...