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Text Presentation of Oral Lectures for Enhancing of Comprehension of an Educational Material

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104479D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 151K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hodgson, R: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Oral lectures are the most common way to educate people everywhere - at schools, colleges and universities. Oral presentations also are very common for communicating messages at meetings, conferences etc.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 36% of the total text.

Text Presentation of Oral Lectures for Enhancing of Comprehension of an Educational Material

Oral lectures are the most common way to educate people everywhere -
at schools, colleges and universities.  Oral presentations also are
very common for communicating messages at meetings, conferences etc.

The oral way of presentation has shortcomings some of which are
enlisted below:

1.  The speed of oral presentation is significantly less than the
    speed with which people can comprehend texts via reading.  Speed
    of reading can vary for different people from a few words per

    minute to a few thousands (for people who specially trained for
    the fast reading).

2.  An oral presentation is essentially controlled by a speaker, not
    by individual attenders of lectures.  In general, depending on
    the overall auditory reaction, a lecturer can change the
    character of his presentation (speak faster, cancel some
    material, make a break, etc.).  Nevertheless, this particular
    auditory control cannot satisfy all possible requirements of
    individual listeners.  Contrary to this, readers can choose their
    own path for processing materials, make breaks, return to already
    read material.

3.  Non-native listeners with inadequate knowledge of the source
    language can better comprehend typed messages rather then oral
    ones.

4.  Hard of hearing usually miss a lot in oral lectures and quickly
    become very tired.  Profoundly hearing impaired cannot get
    material at all (for rare exception - via lipreading) and sign
    language interpreters cannot cover technical lectures even for
    people who know sign language.

      Even with these shortcomings oral presentations are more common
than textual material sources by the following reasons.

1.  Lectures required significantly less time for preparation than
    textual materials (manuals, educational texts, books).  Textual
    materials are often generated on the basis of lectures that are
    read by an author during some period.

2.  Lecturers can freely change the course of their lectures
    depending on the audience reaction.  They can answer questions,
    update their presentations with new materials, etc.

3.  Adequate understanding of educational material is not necessary
    better with faster comprehension of presented materials.
    Sometimes students can master presentations better than textual
    ones.

      It is naturally expected that some combination of oral and
textual presentation can improve the overall impression from
lectures.  And, indeed, it is quite common that oral lectures are
coupled with  display of short texts underlying some aspects of oral
presentations.  In this setup the oral source of material is primary
and textual is auxiliary.

      Nevertheless this setup does not fully compensate shortcomings
indicated above.  The goal of this ...