Browse Prior Art Database

Heat Sink for Single Module Low-Temperature Electronic Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104507D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buller, ML: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a heat sink designed for single module low-temperature electronic testing. In testing of electronic devices it is frequently desired to test them at temperatures below the ambient in order to help determine their temperature versus performance characteristics. In the past, this has been done by spraying the devices as they sit on the printed circuit card with chlorinated hydrocarbons from spray bottles or aerosol cans. However, these chemicals are considered to be a factor in the depletion of the ozone layer and, since the sprays simply vent them into the atmosphere, they can no longer be used. Alternative chemicals with high evaporation rates exist, but they are usually flammable or toxic and, therefore, present health and safety concerns in open lab usage.

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Heat Sink for Single Module Low-Temperature Electronic Testing

      Disclosed is a heat sink designed for single module
low-temperature electronic testing.  In testing of electronic devices
it is frequently desired to test them at temperatures below the
ambient in order to help determine their temperature versus
performance characteristics.  In the past, this has been done by
spraying the devices as they sit on the printed circuit card with
chlorinated hydrocarbons from spray bottles or aerosol cans.
However, these chemicals are considered to be a factor in the
depletion of the ozone layer and, since the sprays simply vent them
into the atmosphere, they can no longer be used.  Alternative
chemicals with high evaporation rates exist, but they are usually
flammable or toxic and, therefore, present health and safety concerns
in open lab usage.

      The solution to the problem of cooling a single electronic
device or module during testing without the use of chlorinated
hydrocarbons is to produce a heat sink in the shape of a deep cup.
The flat base of the heat sink is then attached to the module in
question using a standard thermal grease.  The cup is then filled
with liquid nitrogen, which is not flammable or toxic and is not
considered an ozone depleting chemical.  The liquid nitrogen then
serves to cool the single device to which the heat sink is attached.
The interior of the cup can be a simple cavity or could have internal
fins or pins, if desired.  The li...