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Browse Prior Art Database

Passive Interposer Connection Scheme

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104628D
Original Publication Date: 1993-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Konian, RR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a scheme for a high density connector using an interposer between the signal pads to be connected. Present interposer connector schemes rely on the interposer having springs, pins, wires, etc. to make contact with the paired pads. It is hard to achieve good wiping action and to make good contact. It is proposed that the pads have flexible pins attached to them which make contact with the interposer. There are many ways the pins on the pads can make contact with the interposers. In each of the ways illustrated there is very good wiping action.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 77% of the total text.

Passive Interposer Connection Scheme

      Disclosed is a scheme for a high density connector using an
interposer between the signal pads to be connected.  Present
interposer connector schemes rely on the interposer having springs,
pins, wires, etc. to make contact with the paired pads.  It is hard
to achieve good wiping action and to make good contact.  It is
proposed that the pads have flexible pins attached to them which make
contact with the interposer.  There are many ways the pins on the
pads can make contact with the interposers.  In each of the ways
illustrated there is very good wiping action.

      Fig. 1 shows the pins (2) which are attached to the pads (1)
making contact with a mesh made of a springy, continuous filament of
gold plated beryllium copper (3) held in place in the corresponding
cavity in the interposer (4).

      Figs. 2a and 2b show the pins (2) mating with a conducting
hourglass shaped receptacle (5 and 6) held in the corresponding
cavity in the interposer (4).  Two forms are shown:  Fig. 2a has tiny
springs punched into conducting material at the narrow part of the
hourglass, Fig. 2b has the narrow part of the hourglass slit several
times vertically so the pin can spread this area when it enters it.
In both cases the hourglass can have some play within the cavity so
that it can align itself to some degree to the pins.  In both figures
only the top half of the interposer is shown.  The bottom half is
symmetrical.

     ...